Category Archives: Career and Technology Education

Celebrate Workforce Development Month

WorkForceDevelopment

Oklahoma is celebrating Workforce Development Month in September.

A key component to developing a high quality workforce is to make certain our students have the opportunity to strengthen their employability skills. CareerTech student organizations do just that throughout our programs. CTSOs are integrated into CareerTech programs. Student organizations provide opportunities for personal growth and scholastic achievement, as well as developing skills in public speaking, planning and organizing.

Members work on various community projects, competitive events and leadership activities and meet other students who share similar interests. Many students enjoy membership in more than one group.

What It Takes – CareerTech State Director Welcomes Students


Students in Oklahoma CareerTech programs earn credits toward high school graduation as well as the opportunity to prepare for industry recognized certifications and credentials and licenses.

CareerTech Champions

Each year, thousands of Oklahomans reap the benefits provided by Career and Technology Education. CareerTech Champions tell the story of how individuals apply learning to become successful employees, entrepreneurs and leaders in business organizations.

Tarence McLane – Jim E. Hamilton Skills Center

Electrical trades program was the spark this offender needed to get his life started.

THEN: Two stints in jail and two failed attempts at drug rehab. Tarence McLane was on aTarenceMcLane downward spiral before he was accepted into the electrical trades technology program at Jim E. Hamilton Skills Center. That program was a game changer for Tarence, giving him the skills he needed to become a residential, commercial/industrial or maintenance electrician. Tarence said at the Skills Center, he learned:

  • Knowledge of basic safety and how to use specialty electrical tools.
  • How to read blueprints.
  • Career readiness skills that helped him get a job after his release.
  • Code and licensing requirements.
  • Residential, commercial, industrial and motor control wiring techniques.

Tarence knew he desperately needed to change his life, and change it he did. Since his release, he has worked as an electrical inspector for Devon Energy and electrical superintendent for both MMR and Quanta Services. He credits his instructor for much of his success.

“Kevin Copeland was a great instructor who took time for his students,” he said.

NOW: Tarence is no longer using drugs, and he’s taking care of his wife and children. He has even worked with other Skills Centers graduates to help them get jobs and tools.

“I do my best to give back to the CareerTech program and its students when I have the opportunity,” he said.

Tarence works as an inspector and construction manager for the instrumentation and electrical department at WaterBridge Resources. He oversees the company’s electrical construction contractors in the West Texas oilfields.

“My family and I are so thankful CareerTech was an option for me. It is literally what saved my life.”

Tarence McLane, electrician

Technology Centers of the CareerTech Education System

CareerTech’s technology centers provide cost-effective training throughout Oklahoma.

FY18 Technology Centers EnrollmentsThe foundation for Oklahoma’s statewide network of 29 technology center districts, operating a total of 58 campuses statewide, was laid in 1966 when Oklahoma voters approved a constitutional amendment allowing the establishment of what were then called area vocational-technical schools.

One of the main goals of these schools was to provide cost-effective vocational education. The amendment allowed school districts to join together to form a vo-tech district with an independent board of education and its own locally approved tax base. The new school could then offer specialized occupational training programs that sending schools could not afford to offer, or for which they might not have enough enrollment to justify the offering.

Gov. Dewey Bartlett, who campaigned on the issue of industrial expansion, championed the formation of these new schools as the linchpin of his efforts to diversify Oklahoma’s economy, previously so dependent on oil and agriculture. He knew that these schools would teach high school students the technical skills that a diversified Oklahoma economy would need as well as provide Oklahoma adults the opportunity to upgrade existing skills or learn new skills. He also believed these schools would evolve into a critical recruiting tool to attract new jobs and new investments to Oklahoma. Time, and hard work, has proved him right.

Oklahoma’s technology centers serve full-time students, both high school pupils and adult learners. Also, district residents, usually adults, flock to the centers to learn new skills or enhance existing ones in popular short-term courses. While high school students attend tuition-free, adult students are charged nominal tuition to offset costs. Students are frequently able to earn credit hours for their studies from local colleges.

In FY18, 20,971 high school students enrolled in Oklahoma’s technology centers. Most attend approximately three hours per day, either in the morning or the afternoon. Due to increased graduation requirements, centers are adapting schedules and pursuing other avenues to provide students with the flexibility they need to attend. The centers also serve more than 10,000 full-time adult enrollments.

On a statewide average, technology centers receive about two-thirds of their funding at the local level. The remaining is a mixture of state and federal funds.

For more information click here:   Technology Centers

The 52nd Annual Oklahoma Summit

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The 52nd Annual Oklahoma Summit (formerly CareerTech Summer Conference) is scheduled Thursday and Friday, Aug. 1-2, 2019, at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City. The CareerTech Expo is held in conjunction with the summit. If you have questions about the 2019 Oklahoma Summit, contact Andrea Hancock at .

Links:

Conference at a glance

Frequently asked questions

Programs and agendas

Exhibits

Registration

 

CareerTech Student Organization Officers Kicking Off a Great Year

Oklahoma CareerTech student organization officers met earlier this summer for training at CareerTech University.

While at the camp, they also talked about what CareerTech and CTSOs have done for them and can do for others. You can see more in this video:

Industry Experts Gather at BMITE Industry Futuring Panels

More than 40 industry experts discussed business trends and skill sets needed to satisfy Oklahoma’s future employment needs at Oklahoma CareerTech’s Business, Marketing and IT Education Division’s first Industry Futuring Panels.

BMITE Industry Futuring Panels

Industry experts talk about business trends and needed skills at an Oklahoma CareerTech Business, Marketing and IT Education Division Industry Futuring Panel

BMITE hosted the think tank groups earlier this month at Francis Tuttle Technology Center’s Business Innovation Campus. Participants discussed business trends affecting employees’ needed skill sets, skills necessary for workplace success, emerging careers and career pathways and big-picture topics employees need to know

MBA Research, a national career and technology education consultant, organized and facilitated three futuring panels for the business management, finance and marketing cluster areas. Oklahoma is a consortium member of MBA Research and uses the industry-validated national standards developed through its nationwide industry connections. MBA Research will compile all of the panels’ input and its research into a comprehensive report that will help refocus the efforts to build relevant career pathways.

Hussain Ali, state BPA officer from Putnam City High School, and Austin Long and Xavier Hamilton, state DECA officers from Latta High School, spoke to the groups about the connection CareerTech has with students. The officers’ input generated interest in the student organizations and how the industry representatives could get involved and support BPA/DECA activities.

Meals for the three days were sponsored by Gooden Group, Chickasaw Nation and donations collected by the Latta DECA chapter. Refreshments were sponsored by the OKACTE/BMITE teacher organization. A special thanks to these sponsors!

What It Takes – ASIC Partners with CareerTech

CareerTech Skills Centers

The CareerTech Skills Centers School System is a division of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education. Skills Centers specialize in the delivery of career and technology education to inmates under the supervision of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections and juveniles under the supervision of the Oklahoma Office of Juvenile Affairs. The Skills Centers division is also responsible for the state’s secondary dropout recovery initiatives.

Skills Center Enrollments-Welder FY16-1198x599The CareerTech Skills Centers (CTSC) began operations in February of 1971 as the Inmate Training division of the Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education, now the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education.

During our 40+ years of serving incarcerated offenders in Oklahoma, Skills Centers have evolved from a division with a few occupational training programs to a large school system with a multitude of programs and services for both adult and juvenile offenders. The school system began at the Jim E. Hamilton CareerTech Skills Center inside the Jim E. Hamilton (formerly Ouachita) Correctional Center in Hodgen, Okla. Today, the CTSC offers services in state correctional facilities, juvenile detention facilities and community correctional facilities.

A successful transition from corrections to the workplace can mean a life of success for ex-offenders. To prepare offenders for successful transition, career technical education, employability and life skills are integrated into this educational delivery system. Skills centers students may seek certifications recognized by both state and national industries. Career Readiness Credentials (CRC) may be secured documenting work readiness skills many business and industry employers seek. The CTSC provides students with numerous interconnected and integrated components, each an integral part of preparing offenders for success in the workplace and in society.

The CTSC works in conjunction with the Oklahoma Department of Corrections (DOC) and Oklahoma Correctional Industries (OCI) to offer three U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, registered apprenticeship programs for offenders. These programs are each three-to-four years in length and are in the areas of meat-cutting, commercial food preparation and cabinet building.

In 1996, the CTSC entered into an agreement with the Oklahoma Office of Juvenile Affairs (OJA) to provide training to juvenile offenders detained in Oklahoma facilities. The CTSC and OJA have partnered with the Associated General Contractors (AGC). The AGC, through its member contractors, also assists the CTSC in development of appropriate curriculum and learning activities.

The intent of this division of CareerTech is to continue to evolve as business and industry changes. The goal is to provide educational services that will cause skills centers students to seek and find success in the workplace and in society.

For more information click here: Skills Centers

Oklahoma CareerTech Offers Training to Tech Center Student Services Workers

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Sixteen Oklahoma technology center student services employees recently graduated from the Oklahoma Department of CareerTech’s Student Services Endorsement Program.

The program is designed to equip student services employees with a foundation in the philosophy, knowledge and skills that are unique to Oklahoma’s CareerTech System.

Graduates were Tiffany Ash, customer service, and Jennifer Tupper, grants and special projects coordinator, both of Moore Norman Tech; Sheila Boaldin, assessment coordinator, Bryan Roybal, special needs adviser, and Tara Chase, career adviser, all of Francis Tuttle Tech; Tiffany Bruce, student services director, Tri County Tech; RaChel Crume, director of student services, Southwest Tech; Carly Jones, PATHS counselor, Stoni Peck, school counselor, and Stephanie Smithart, financial aid/registrar, all of Kiamichi Tech; Mindi Mitchell, employment specialist, Kristi Stephens, counselor, and Kari Stomprud, special needs coordinator, all of Canadian Valley Tech; Candyce Myers, director of student services, Chisholm Trail Tech; Shayne Stanford, career counselor, Autry Tech; and Sheila Williams, counselor/student services coordinator, Green Country Tech.

The Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education offers the Student Services Endorsement Program every other year to help technology center student services workers to better assist their students.

“Building a network of support and resources is vital to student success as the role of student services encompasses counselors, job placement staff, career specialists, assessment staff, special needs coordinators and financial aid administrators,” said A.J. Crowell, career development specialist at ODCTE.

The program was designed for newly hired technology center staff, but veteran staff members can also benefit from it, he said.

The Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education provides leadership and resources and assures standards of excellence for a comprehensive statewide system of career and technology education. The system offers programs and services in 29 technology center districts operating on 58 campuses, 393 K-12 school districts, 16 Skills Centers campuses that include three juvenile facilities and 31 adult basic education service providers.

The agency is governed by the State Board of Career and Technology Education and works closely with the State Department of Education and the State Regents for Higher Education to provide a seamless educational system for all Oklahomans.

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