Category Archives: Oklahoma CareerTech

ODCTE Offers Career Planning Resources

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Not sure how to research an occupation or plan your education to your chosen career? Need some help planning your job search, like preparing your resume or learning interviewing tips? OK Career Guide, Oklahoma’s statewide career system supported by the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, can help.

The online system, which launched Aug. 21, 2015, is built specifically for Oklahoma. It serves a wide audience and provides data to administrators. Oklahoma schools and all Oklahomans have access to the online tool at no cost.

OK Career Guide allows users to achieve the following:

  • Develop career awareness.
  • Develop individual career plans.
  • Create online portfolios.
  • Take assessments.
  • Explore careers.
  • Research and link to post-secondary schools.
  • Locate scholarships.
  • Set career goals.
  • Connect to business and industry.
  • Build resumes and cover letters.

The CAREERTECH Podcast is LIVE!

SUBSCRIBE to CareerTech’s new podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIHorizon2n, Google, Blubrry, or the CareerTech Horizon website.

What did you have to go through, to get where you are today?

In our first episode of CareerTech Horizon, we take a look at a few Oklahoman’s “origin stories.” You’ll learn about:

  • An HVAC instructor who overcame his own past failures in education, and how he now helps others do the same.
  • A “jack of all trades” who decides to become a cosmetologist, so he can get closer to his daughters.
  • An Air Force veteran who now teaches home economics, and how a similar approach can be used in serving one’s country, to serving one’s students.

CareerTechHorizon

 

Oklahoma CareerTech Celebrates Careers in Construction Month

Construction is one of Oklahoma’s largest industries, and it is only getting bigger.

More than 82,000 Oklahomans work in construction, but more than 119,000 new jobs are expected to open in Oklahoma by 2026. In the entire country, an additional 1.4 million construction professionals will be needed by 2022.

A nationwide skills gap, however, means those construction positions may go unfilled. Oklahoma CareerTech is working to fill that gap with construction trades training and education at 58 technology center campuses statewide and at its skills centers.

“Oklahoma has a critical shortage of workforce in construction. We regularly hear from contractors who have difficulty finding qualified entry level employees, and they are holding back on bidding projects,” said Jeff Huffman, trade and industrial education program manager at ODCTE. “Careers in Construction Month showcases all of the career fields in construction. Oklahoma CareerTech can help you map a successful path to many available career options in construction.”

Oklahoma CareerTech offers education in carpentry, masonry, HVAC, plumbing, electrical work, heavy equipment operation, cabinetmaking and computer-aided design and drafting at technology centers and skills centers. The system offers construction-related certifications in 13 areas.

The system’s construction trades programs are celebrating the national Careers in Construction Month in October, and Gov. Kevin Stitt has signed a proclamation declaring that October is Careers in Construction Month in Oklahoma.

Careers in Construction Month was founded by the National Center for Construction Education and Research and Build Your Future to increase public awareness and inspire the next generation of construction craft professionals.

For more information about CareerTech’s construction trades programs, go to https://www.okcareertech.org/educators/career-clusters/architecture-and-construction or visit your local technology center.

The Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education provides leadership and resources and assures standards of excellence for a comprehensive statewide system of career and technology education. The system offers programs and services in 29 technology center districts operating on 58 campuses, 394 K-12 school districts, 16 Skills Centers campuses that include three juvenile facilities and 32 adult basic education service providers.

The agency is governed by the State Board of Career and Technology Education and works closely with the State Department of Education and the State Regents for Higher Education to provide a seamless educational system for all Oklahomans.

CareerTech Educators Receive Awards

Oklahoma CareerTech and OkACTE honored a number of educators during the Oklahoma Summit, the 52nd annual CareerTech summer conference.

Among them were Dusty Ricks, superintendent of Mid-America Technology Center in Wayne, who received the Francis Tuttle Career Excellence Award, and Ruth Peace, who received the Arch Alexander Award. Peace retired in June 2019 as ODCTE’s information management division manager.

2019SummitAwardWinners

Celebrate Workforce Development Month

WorkForceDevelopment

Oklahoma is celebrating Workforce Development Month in September.

A key component to developing a high quality workforce is to make certain our students have the opportunity to strengthen their employability skills. CareerTech student organizations do just that throughout our programs. CTSOs are integrated into CareerTech programs. Student organizations provide opportunities for personal growth and scholastic achievement, as well as developing skills in public speaking, planning and organizing.

Members work on various community projects, competitive events and leadership activities and meet other students who share similar interests. Many students enjoy membership in more than one group.

What It Takes – CareerTech State Director Welcomes Students


Students in Oklahoma CareerTech programs earn credits toward high school graduation as well as the opportunity to prepare for industry recognized certifications and credentials and licenses.

Technology Centers of the CareerTech Education System

CareerTech’s technology centers provide cost-effective training throughout Oklahoma.

FY18 Technology Centers EnrollmentsThe foundation for Oklahoma’s statewide network of 29 technology center districts, operating a total of 58 campuses statewide, was laid in 1966 when Oklahoma voters approved a constitutional amendment allowing the establishment of what were then called area vocational-technical schools.

One of the main goals of these schools was to provide cost-effective vocational education. The amendment allowed school districts to join together to form a vo-tech district with an independent board of education and its own locally approved tax base. The new school could then offer specialized occupational training programs that sending schools could not afford to offer, or for which they might not have enough enrollment to justify the offering.

Gov. Dewey Bartlett, who campaigned on the issue of industrial expansion, championed the formation of these new schools as the linchpin of his efforts to diversify Oklahoma’s economy, previously so dependent on oil and agriculture. He knew that these schools would teach high school students the technical skills that a diversified Oklahoma economy would need as well as provide Oklahoma adults the opportunity to upgrade existing skills or learn new skills. He also believed these schools would evolve into a critical recruiting tool to attract new jobs and new investments to Oklahoma. Time, and hard work, has proved him right.

Oklahoma’s technology centers serve full-time students, both high school pupils and adult learners. Also, district residents, usually adults, flock to the centers to learn new skills or enhance existing ones in popular short-term courses. While high school students attend tuition-free, adult students are charged nominal tuition to offset costs. Students are frequently able to earn credit hours for their studies from local colleges.

In FY18, 20,971 high school students enrolled in Oklahoma’s technology centers. Most attend approximately three hours per day, either in the morning or the afternoon. Due to increased graduation requirements, centers are adapting schedules and pursuing other avenues to provide students with the flexibility they need to attend. The centers also serve more than 10,000 full-time adult enrollments.

On a statewide average, technology centers receive about two-thirds of their funding at the local level. The remaining is a mixture of state and federal funds.

For more information click here:   Technology Centers

The 52nd Annual Oklahoma Summit

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The 52nd Annual Oklahoma Summit (formerly CareerTech Summer Conference) is scheduled Thursday and Friday, Aug. 1-2, 2019, at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City. The CareerTech Expo is held in conjunction with the summit. If you have questions about the 2019 Oklahoma Summit, contact Andrea Hancock at .

Links:

Conference at a glance

Frequently asked questions

Programs and agendas

Exhibits

Registration

 

CareerTech Student Organization Officers Kicking Off a Great Year

Oklahoma CareerTech student organization officers met earlier this summer for training at CareerTech University.

While at the camp, they also talked about what CareerTech and CTSOs have done for them and can do for others. You can see more in this video:

Industry Experts Gather at BMITE Industry Futuring Panels

More than 40 industry experts discussed business trends and skill sets needed to satisfy Oklahoma’s future employment needs at Oklahoma CareerTech’s Business, Marketing and IT Education Division’s first Industry Futuring Panels.

BMITE Industry Futuring Panels

Industry experts talk about business trends and needed skills at an Oklahoma CareerTech Business, Marketing and IT Education Division Industry Futuring Panel

BMITE hosted the think tank groups earlier this month at Francis Tuttle Technology Center’s Business Innovation Campus. Participants discussed business trends affecting employees’ needed skill sets, skills necessary for workplace success, emerging careers and career pathways and big-picture topics employees need to know

MBA Research, a national career and technology education consultant, organized and facilitated three futuring panels for the business management, finance and marketing cluster areas. Oklahoma is a consortium member of MBA Research and uses the industry-validated national standards developed through its nationwide industry connections. MBA Research will compile all of the panels’ input and its research into a comprehensive report that will help refocus the efforts to build relevant career pathways.

Hussain Ali, state BPA officer from Putnam City High School, and Austin Long and Xavier Hamilton, state DECA officers from Latta High School, spoke to the groups about the connection CareerTech has with students. The officers’ input generated interest in the student organizations and how the industry representatives could get involved and support BPA/DECA activities.

Meals for the three days were sponsored by Gooden Group, Chickasaw Nation and donations collected by the Latta DECA chapter. Refreshments were sponsored by the OKACTE/BMITE teacher organization. A special thanks to these sponsors!

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