Category Archives: Trade and Industrial Education

CareerTech Champions

Each year, thousands of Oklahomans reap the benefits provided by Career and Technology Education. CareerTech Champions tell the story of how individuals apply learning to become successful employees, entrepreneurs and leaders in business organizations.

Ethan Tucker – Red River Technology Center

Home-school student does double-duty at Red River Technology Center.Ethan Tucker

THEN: A home-school student growing up on his grandparents’ farm. Ethan Tucker never received a diploma, and when he decided to work outside the farm, his options were limited. At Red River Technology Center, he signed up for high school equivalency classes, at the same time enrolling in Red River’s HVAC program. He went half days to HSE classes, and the other half of the day he studied HVAC.

“I chose HVAC because there’s a constant need for heating, and in Oklahoma there’s an even greater need for cooling experts,” Ethan said.

Ethan said at Red River, he:

  • Earned his HSE diploma.
  • Learned fundamentals of electrical skills.
  • Gained mechanical troubleshooting skills related to heating and air conditioning.
  • Won both state and national titles at SkillsUSA competitions.

“I’m a competitive guy,” he said, “and SkillsUSA allowed me to compete while working on my troubleshooting skills.”

NOW: Ethan is an industrial maintenance technician for Goodyear Tire and Rubber in Lawton, Oklahoma.

SkillsUSA is probably the best decision I’ve ever made.”

Ethan Tucker, industrial maintenance technician

CareerTech Champions

Each year, thousands of Oklahomans reap the benefits provided by Career and Technology Education. CareerTech Champions tell the story of how individuals apply learning to become successful employees, entrepreneurs and leaders in business organizations.

Hailee Lindo – Canadian Valley Technology CenterHaileeLindo

Carpenter’s daughter learns design from the outside in.

THEN: A 16-year-old Piedmont High School student whose father was a framing carpenter. Hailee Lindo said she had been on a lot of building sites with her father. She knew she was interested in houses, but not in building them. Hailee says she wants to be an interior designer, and she enrolled in Canadian Valley Tech’s construction trades program as a way to get a head start on her career.

At CV Tech, Hailee:

  • Is SkillsUSA vice president of the morning chapter.
  • Qualified for the regional SkillsUSA contest in cabinet making.
  • Was named student of the quarter for construction trades.
  • Serves as CV Tech’s student ambassador.

NOW: Hailee doesn’t seem to mind being in a mostly male classroom, but she wishes carpentry wasn’t a male-dominated field. She hopes that in the future there are more female framers in the carpentry industry. In the meantime, she’s learning to read blueprints and getting familiar with building codes and inspection regulations. She’ll take this knowledge with her when she goes to college, where she plans to major in interior design.

Student Engineers Solving Real World Problems

October is national Manufacturing Month and Oklahoma CareerTech student engineers are solving real-world problems.

Students at Northeast Technology Center saw an everyday problem at Hopkins Manufacturing and developed a solution that saved money and created a safer workplace.

Aerospace Impact – Want One?

Oklahoma’s Aerospace industry employs more than 200,000 Oklahomans, and the industry is growing. Oklahoma CareerTech offers training in a variety of aerospace careers.

Click HERE to locate Oklahoma’s technology center districts and to discover careers in aerospace and more!

 

CTE New Teacher Academies

New teacher academy

New Teacher Academies will take place at the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education during the month of July. These educational opportunities are designed to help new teachers navigate the CareerTech system. Participants will gain new resources, learn appropriate procedures, engage in activities and network with teachers from across the state.

For additional information, please contact your division listed below and welcome to CareerTech!

Division Contacts for Enrollment

New Agricultural Education Teachers (July 9-10)

Rose Bonjour, phone: 405.743.5487, email: rose.bonjour@careertech.ok.gov

Guy Shoulders, phone: 405.743.5488, email: guy.shouders@careertech.ok.gov

New Business, Marketing and Information Technology Education Teachers (July 24-26)

Tonja Norwood, phone: 405.743.5426, email: tonja.norwood@careertech.ok.gov

New Family and Consumer Sciences Education Teachers (July 16-19)

Mary Jane Grayson, phone: 405.743.5469, email: maryjane.grayson@careertech.ok.gov

New Health Careers Education Teachers (July 9-11)

Lara Morris, phone: 405.743.5106, email: lara.skaggs@careertech.ok.gov

New Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Teachers

Dawn Frank, phone: 405.743.5438, email: dawn.frank@careertech.ok.gov

New Trade and Industrial Education Teachers (July 17-19)

John Day, phone: 405.743.5146, email: john.day@careertech.ok.gov

H.L. Baird, phone: 405.743.5517, email: h.l.baird@careertech.ok.gov

 

 

 

K-12 Schools in the Oklahoma CareerTech Education System

K-12programs

School Grades 6-12 Offer CareerTech Career Training

Most of Oklahoma’s career and technology education students at the secondary level are enrolled in CareerTech programs in their local schools. In FY17, a total of 1,319 CareerTech teachers in 391 K-12 public school districts served a total enrollment of 139,598.

These students are in Grades 6-12 and are enrolled in one-period CareerTech programs including agricultural education; business, marketing and information technology education; family and consumer sciences; health careers education; science, technology, engineering and mathematics education; and trade and industrial education.

Value Added

Such programs add value to students’ high school careers. Not only do they meet the same academic standards required of all other students, they learn skills to manage the challenge of living and working in a diverse society. Their career and technology education classrooms provide a hands-on learning environment where they can increase technological proficiency, develop entrepreneurial skills and gain practical experience. In addition, technology education programs, designed for Grades 6-10, also provide students the opportunity to explore and experience potential careers.

Student Organizations

These K-12 school programs focus on producing well-rounded students. Students learn theory in the classroom, practice their skills in labs and shops, and gain vital leadership and teamwork skills through their participation in one of seven career and technology student organizations. These organizations include:

  • BPA – Business Professionals of America
  • DECA – Marketing
  • FCCLA – Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America
  • FFA – Agriculture, food, and natural resources student organization
  • HOSA – Future Health Professionals
  • SkillsUSA – Architecture and construction student organization
  • TSA – Technology Student Association
  • NTHS – National Technical Honor Society

More than 88,000 students join these seven organizations annually. These organizations afford them the opportunity to participate in both leadership and skill contests at the local, state, and national levels.

Success Starts on the Front Line

The success of the Oklahoma CareerTech system begins on the front line. Instructors with real-world experiences strive to stay on the cutting edge of technology. Each year, instructors are offered opportunities to participate in educational development and training programs designed to hone their technical and teaching skills. Classroom curriculum is available through the Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center. In addition, program specialists from the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education provide technical assistance to instructors.

CareerTech Champions

Each year, thousands of Oklahomans reap the benefits provided by Career and Technology Education. CareerTech Champions tell the story of how individuals apply learning to become successful employees, entrepreneurs and leaders in business organizations.

Tiffany Kinsey – Tri County Technology Center

Tiffany Kinsey1THEN: A high school student torn between two vastly different programs at her local technology center. Tiffany Kinsey was interested in taking both culinary arts and welding at Tri County Technology Center. She chose welding because she liked the idea of learning a little about a lot and admitted she didn’t know much about welding — at least not then.

Tiffany Kinsey2

At Tri County Tech she learned enough about welding to know she liked it, and she learned that she had a passion for the fine detail associated with it. After graduating from high school and Tri County’s welding program, she attended Spartan School of Aeronautics to learn how to X-ray welds. Three years into her career, she was bringing home a six-figure salary. Tiffany said because of Tri County Tech she

  • Discovered a passion for welding.
  • Learned basic welding techniques.
  • Has no college debts.
  • Is highly recruited in the oil and gas industry.

“The teachers are great at Tri County Tech,” Tiffany said. “They are involved in their students’ education and are true role models.”

NOW: An advanced ultrasonics technician for Element Integrity in Bartlesville, inspecting pressure valves at plants and pump stations. Tiffany is studying how infrared drones can help look for leaks. She specializes in nondestructive testing and examination.

“CareerTech students are able to get into the industry and find out what they like, what their passions are, and go to work.”

Tiffany Kinsey
Welder, Element Integrity

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