Pontotoc Tech Grads Become International HOSA Champions

Amanda London and Trinity Roe, 2020 practical nursing graduates from Pontotoc Technology Center in Ada, placed first in their category in HOSA International Leadership Conference competition with a service project to promote community awareness of meningitis.

Their project began with a presentation and expanded to include maroon ribbons, a video and a Facebook page. They placed second in state competition before advance to the international competition.

You can read more on The Ada News website.

OK CareerTech Partners to Meet Workforce Shortage In The Meat Processing Industry

Oklahoma CareerTech and the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry announced new educational programs this week to help curb a workforce shortage in Meat Displaythe meat processing industry.

The curriculum was designed to encourage more commodity processing within the state and help address the ever-growing labor shortage within meat processing plants across the state. It also helps to supply a skilled workforce to rural areas and processing plants across the state.

“This is an exciting day for the Oklahoma meat processing sector,” said Blayne Arthur, Oklahoma secretary of agriculture. “I am very proud to be here especially because this solves problems across the board. A lot of times, we just address one piece of something but this provides a solution to both our producers and consumers.”

Central Technology Center plans to offer multilevel, customizable, online courses to provide students with the certification that aligns with the American Meat Science Association while still supporting industry need. It will provide workforce development and training within a timely manner.

Marcie Mack, state director of CareerTech, explained at the announcement event how CareerTech began the process of offering these courses by meeting with an industry panel to determine the specific criteria and credentials they are needing in their workforce.

“Right now, we have the new opportunity for individuals to enroll on our website in three meat certification programs,” she said. “The initial phase will be online to help students get their foot in the door. Eventually, we will move to in-person classes for courses such as carcass harvesting.”

You can find more information about the courses on the CareerTech website.

Oklahoma CareerTech Student Organizations Give Back

Oklahoma CareerTech student organizations may have ended their yea4_in_web_red_blkr online with virtual meetings, but they continued to give back with statewide philanthropic efforts.

Oklahoma HOSA members donated more than $31,900 to the National Pediatric Cancer Foundation, and Oklahoma FCCLA members helped raise more than $7,000 for the Leukemia Lymphoma Society. FCCLA members and advisers also have been sewing hundreds of masks to help essential workers during the pandemic.

Oklahoma FFA members donated 565 animals as part of the FFA Hunger Challenge to benefit the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma and the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma. The Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma was able to make 904,000 protein sticks from the donated animals. Some FFA chapters also donated cash through the Cents Makes Sense program by giving $1 from each fundraising item sold.

Oklahoma BPA members raised more than $7,200 for Special Olympics Oklahoma, and Oklahoma DECA members raised $700 for the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

Gordon Cooper Tech Builds Public Safety Training Center

Gordon Cooper Technology Center has built the Marty Lewis Public Safety Training GordonCooperFacility at the south end of its campus. It is named after a former superintendent.

The $5 million facility will house training for area high school students and working law enforcement, firefighters, EMTs and paramedics.

You can read more on the Shawnee News-Star’s website.

CareerTech Champions

Skyler Riggle – Gordon Cooper Technology Center

RiggleSmall town graduate has big plans for his future.

THEN: He came from a long line of veterans and dreamed of attending the U.S. Naval Academy. Asher High School sophomore Skyler Riggle enrolled in Gordon Cooper Technology Center’s pre-engineering academy, where he had the opportunity to explore and investigate engineering careers. As well as tackling hands-on college prep activities in mathematics and science, Skyler also

  • Competed with the school’s robotics team.
  • Was chosen as one of only 300 students in the country to receive the prestigious Gates Scholarship.
  • Received a conditional offer to the U.S. Naval Academy Preparatory School.
  • Received the valedictorian scholarship from the University of Oklahoma.

NOW: Once he’s been officially accepted to the USNA, Skyler will have to choose between OU and USNA Preparatory School, where he would complete a 10-month course to prepare for the Naval Academy.

Skyler’s principal and counselor Shawna Magby said Skyler was not your typical high school student.

“He’s very diligent, responsible and self-motivated,” she said.

Oklahoma CareerTech Awards $2.35 Million in Lottery Grants

4_in_web_red_blkThe Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education has awarded just over $2.35 million in lottery grants to CareerTech programs for the 2020-21 school year, along with $500,000 in scholarships in the 2019-20 school year.

ODCTE receives almost 5 percent of the Oklahoma Education Lottery Trust Fund, which it uses to help CareerTech programs upgrade equipment and to provide scholarships to educators to continue their own education to fulfill CareerTech teacher certification and credential requirements. Oklahoma CareerTech starts each year’s competitive grant process only after it receives the lottery funds.

CareerTech sixth through 12th grade programs and technology centers submit grant proposals that include their plans for using the funds to innovate and positively affect students. Because it is a competitive process, not all those who apply will receive funds.

“Instructors and students throughout the system benefit from funds received from the Oklahoma Lottery,” said Marcie Mack, CareerTech state director. “Through the competitive grant process each year, there is a direct investment in the classroom and training experiences with new equipment, technology and enhanced instructional resources in a variety of ways.”

Ninety CareerTech programs in 69 PK-12th grade schools and nine technology centers received grants in the 2020-21 school year. CareerTech awarded 486 teacher and administrator certification scholarships worth a total of $500,000 in the 2019-20 school year.

Technology centers will invest in a wide range of equipment; examples are a police driver training simulator and other law enforcement training equipment; welding and metal fabrication equipment; computers, printers and other hardware; software; and virtual reality equipment for health careers education.

The 69 PK-12th grade schools received 90 lottery grants. Examples of classroom resources are welding equipment; tablets and other computer equipment, including software; greenhouse equipment; digital cameras and other photography equipment; apparel design and production equipment; food preparation and nutritional sciences equipment; microscopes; patient simulators and other health equipment; drones; construction shop equipment; and other equipment to enhance the CareerTech programs.

The Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education provides leadership and resources and assures standards of excellence for a comprehensive statewide system of career and technology education. The system offers programs and services in 29 technology center districts operating on 58 campuses, 394 K-12 school districts, 16 Skills Centers campuses that include three juvenile facilities and 32 adult basic education service providers.

The agency is governed by the State Board of Career and Technology Education and works closely with the State Department of Education and the State Regents for Higher Education to provide a seamless educational system for all Oklahomans.

CareerTech Horizon Podcast: “Feels Like Home”

BreadWhile you were at home during the coronavirus lockdown, did you find yourself trying to learn new “home skills?”

With people turning to things like baking and sewing, some for the first time, Family and Consumer Science teachers have suddenly found their subject in high demand. In this episode, we sit down with Terri Hollarn, a longtime FCS educator and state administrator, on how an elective class is becoming essential learning.

We also highlight the shortage of FCS teachers across the country, and the hope that this crisis may encourage more people to become teachers.

You can follow us on Twitter @CT_Horizon, or find us on Facebook.

You can also visit our website, cthorizon.org for show notes, discussion, and bonus content, “Beyond Your Horizon.”

Beyond Your Horizon: Learn more about today’s stories
From the Archives: Classic Horizon Stories from the world of FCS

OK CareerTech: A Family Positive Workplace

We are excited to announce the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education has been named a 2020 Family Positive Workplace! This official recognition from the Oklahoma Family Positive Workplace Council along with the Potts Family Foundation and other partners shows our dedication to our employees.

FamilyPositiveWorkplace

Oklahoma Technology Centers Virtually Teaching Students, Helping Businesses

Working remotely and having adjusted work environments to fight COVID-19 doesn’t DeliveryArms.jpjgmean Oklahoma CareerTech’s delivery arms have stopped offering services.

Like the state’s preK-12th grade public schools, CareerTech’s statewide network of technology centers has entered the world of distance learning for its secondary and postsecondary students. The tech centers are continuing to provide education — including classes and assignments — through web-based technology and, if needed, paper packets.

An auto collision and refinishing instructor at Metro Technology Centers in Oklahoma City is allowing students to see what he is working on with live feeds from his shop at his home. A diesel technology instructor at Gordon Cooper Technology Center in Shawnee is creating videos of repairs he is doing in his own shop in addition to having Zoom meetings, assignments and quizzes.

“The good from this is finding yet another way to teach,” said Ed Jolly of Gordon Cooper Tech.

A service careers instructor at Canadian Valley Technology Center’s El Reno campus has created YouTube instructional videos and is giving his students assignments based on each video’s information. Some are hands-on, like mowing lawns or using certain landscape tools, said instructor Jayson Floyd, and others are written.

Some of his students, however, do not have internet access, he said.

“For those students, I will be calling them three times a week and directing them to a hands-on activity they can perform within their house that is related to what I teach,” he said.

ODCTE is posting tech centers’ distance learning plans at okcareer.tech/Techplans. Students can contact their technology centers to receive information about the tech center’s distance learning plans and requirements.

In addition, the technology centers continue to offer training to Oklahoma business and industry clients when possible. Businesses with workforce training needs can contact their local technology centers to explore distance learning options.

To help support career and technology educators across the state, the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education has instructional resources, okcareer.tech/CTinstruct, and guidance on financial, educational and other issues as well at okcareer.tech/CTFAQs.

“Oklahoma CareerTech is here to support our stakeholders, and we will make it through this situation together while continuing to provide education that meets the needs of our students and our state,” said Marcie Mack, ODCTE state director.

The Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education provides leadership and resources and assures standards of excellence for a comprehensive statewide system of career and technology education. The system offers programs and services in 29 technology center districts operating on 58 campuses, 394 K-12 school districts, 16 Skills Centers campuses that include three juvenile facilities and 32 adult basic education service providers.

The agency is governed by the State Board of Career and Technology Education and works closely with the State Department of Education and the State Regents for Higher Education to provide a seamless educational system for all Oklahomans.

CareerTech Champions

Trevor Hughes – Meridian Technology Center, FFA, HOSA

FFA taught Morrison High School student a $60,000 lesson about hard work.

THEN: His father once told him, “If you’re the smartest person in the room, then you’re Hughesin the wrong room.” So,Trevor Hughes found a different room. The high school junior said he needed more challenging math and science classes than his small high school was able to offer him, so Hughes enrolled in Meridian Technology Center’s biomedical sciences program. There, the Morrison High School standout was able to take anatomy, physiology, precalculus and biomedical sciences.

Already a member of FFA, Hughes enrolled in HOSA, the CareerTech student organization affiliated with health careers education. At Meridian Tech, he said he learned about

  • Lab safety and procedures.
  • The body’s reactions to everything from diseases to open wounds.
  • The importance of homeostasis.

After a year at Meridian, Hughes took college and high school classes concurrently. Hughes said he knows the value of hard work, and he attributes that to his membership in FFA.

“I am forever in debt to the FFA,” he said. “I am thankful for every person who pushed me to better myself, and I hope to carry on the values of the organization for the rest of my life.”

In addition to classwork and involvement in CareerTech student organizations, Hughes played baseball, football and piano.

Still, he said, he found time to apply for numerous college scholarships, and one of those paid off in a big way. Hughes received the OG&E Positive Energy Scholarship. If he keeps his grades up, that scholarship will be worth $60,000 throughout his college career.

NOW: This fall, Hughes will major in engineering at Oklahoma State University. After graduation from OSU, he hopes to travel the world and inspect above-ground oil storage tanks.

“A life full of service rather than self-absorption is a life well lived.”

Trevor Hughes

 

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